Just call me Casey Jones

I’ve recently found myself involved in some RoR work. It took a bit to take my java blinders off, but since they’ve been off, the work has been great. With past Grails experience in mind, here are a few first observations after a couple of weeks of being a Rails dev under my belt.

I like migrations
I used to think I liked the “declare everything in the model” style of defining models in grails, but since then I’ve come to appreciate having to write migrations for the (dare I say?) discipline they force upon the author. Writing those migrations makes me think carefully about how the model change I’m trying to make impacts what’s already in the database.

Plugin/gem maturity
The community is strong – there are far more useful plugins/gems available for RoR apps than there are for Grails apps. You get just a few key choices in a Grails app. With an RoR app, and this sometimes can be cause for concern, there are many plugins to choose from – authorization and authentication gems are a good example. There are basically two choices in Grails – Spring Security and JSecurity. There are many choices for RoR apps, and further, they can be mixed and matched with the authorization and authentication components being separate.

Railscasts
So useful. I’d like to have the option of choosing a celebrity voice-over for them, though. Homer Simpson and/or Snoop Dogg would be my choices. http://railscasts.com/

The learning curve
Groovy & Grails has a definite advantage in being easier to pick up for someone with a java background. I think this is also a downfall of groovy/grails, because it is so easy to fall back to java instead of learning a new (or more efficient) way to solve a problem (ie with a new language and framework a la RoR).

The enterprise and it’s architects
Code that runs on hardware they’ve already got, that leverages existing resources (people and hardware), and is at least somewhat familiar to them is appealing. RoR is not this.

C to tha I
If I can’t roll a build and have Chuck Norris give me the thumbs up afterwards, I am somehow not satisfied. Autotest, rspec, and growl can get me by in the meantime.

… I just wrote a rake task. I’ll write about that later.

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